Imaginary Lines

WARNING: this post may question your belief system, alter paradigms, and possibly offend you. It is written in the spirit of open exchange an exploration of ideas (some of which are argued to open the floor for discussion. I do not necessarily agree with or believe the ideas I pose). If you wish to debate and/or comment, please do so. I encourage it. If you are not open to discussion, or are easily threatened by new ideas/offended, please find a different post to read. There are many of different tones and interests on the right hand side of your screen (unless i change the layout). Thank You.

I want to start by saying this post is based upon the following premise: society is a construct of the human imagination. The rules are arbitrarily made up by those who have “power” and are in leadership positions, or suggested and voted upon by the community, or parts thereof. We (the “royal we”) entangle ourselves in a net of imaginary lines that vary by location and the society of that location.

An example: countries, states, cities, districts. All have boundaries, but most are imaginary lines on the ground. Some people have created physical barriers on their boundaries, or physical “proof” of this line. However, wars have been waged between neighbors, cities, and countries because they disagree on where this line should be.

There are imaginary lines drawn around our very selves. They colour our interactions with others and limit our perception of possible. I am talking about personal boundaries. I grew up learning things like, “don’t talk to strangers,” and, “you have to ask before hugging people.” (I was and am a very friendly person, I needed reminded that not everyone was as friendly.)

Don’t get me wrong, I understand that a certain level of boundaries is necessary for safety (like children not talking to just anybody about anything). Sometimes I wonder why society poses some of them, or the family one grew up on does. They obviously inform and guide our behavior on a daily basis. You act one way in public, one with friends, one at work… It can be tiring to remember what you do and do not.

A topic I find most interesting is taboos. These are generally created for a reason, and can stem from health hazards, paranoia, a single person’s dislike, etc. A good example: some Native Americans have placed a taboo on eating or drinking near graves. Some say the bad spirits will come and make you sick, that you might die, too. This, I hear, likely stemmed from grave mold and microbes that caused illness, hallucinations, and sometimes death. There are similar reasons why one doesn’t eat certain animals or foods.

While bacon is allowed in my house on occasion, I am allergic to pork. It makes me sick if I consume more than a teeny bit, and the smell of it cooking makes me nauseous. While not taboo, it is greatly frowned upon to cook it at my place. Guess it is a good thing we both like other meats.

One thing I am working on are the sets of lines in a workplace. I consciously understand that we keep a certain level of distance so the clients don’t get the wrong impression. I work with an emotionally vulnerable population. Those are for everyone’s safety. Lines between employees, managers, directors, etc. are more difficult for me. Maybe this issue is because of my natural friendliness, or perhaps my desire to see everyone on a peer level. Either way, or any way, I am working on it… Though those lines are a little vague in a community-based workplace like mine, they exist and I am figuring them out.

What imaginary lines lie between you and I, dear reader? Orator and audience, or perhaps rambler and hapless listener… I would like to believe you enjoy my work, or you wouldn’t read. But are you interested enough to discuss? To debate? To oppose? I would love the stimulating discussion.

Do you dare? (^_~)
~N

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About N B

Artist, critic, friend, and rambly-ponderer.
This entry was posted in Family, Friends, Life in General and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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